Hey, I haven’t posted in so long

That they’ve gone and changed the interface.
“What kind of post am I making?”
WTF, that is, how do I know when I haven’t even started yet.
Anyway, short version?
Stuff happened, and I’m still alive. 
Literally.

At the beginning of November I had a day with a persistent dry cough, and the next day felt sort of crappy, and finally I ended up in the emergency room at midnight.
Somehow it is always late night in the emergency room.
I was thoroughly scanned and examined and x-rayed and about anything you can think of.
After all the results were in I was on oxygen up in a hospital bed since they had found pulmonary embolisms in both lungs.
They sent me home the next day, but later I ended up back for a week when a bit of lung died (eek!).
I am now at home recovering.
Recovering is sloooooooooow.

The blood thinners don’t actually dissolve the clots -the embolisms are clots blocking up things in my lungs – they just keep me from making more.
The actual clots themselves apparently gradually disperse over time.
And they mean gradually, I’m still on oxygen after a month, and I’ll be on blood thinners for at least six months, maybe more.

Still, there has been a lot of improvement.
I can now sit still without needing oxygen, unless I start talking a lot.
I can more or less concentrate on things better, though it isn’t up to normal yet.
(Oddly, brainwork is actually work – my ability to focus starts fading after a while.)
But I can walk around the house, trailing my oxygen tubing for the amusement of the cats, and, unless I get too ambitious, I don’t end up gasping after a run to the kitchen.
I can actually put together a sandwich on my own!
When I got out of the hospital and came home, just walking to the bathroom and back took a good five minutes of recovery, so I am pretty happy about the improvement.

 At this point I’m enough better that cabin fever is setting in.
I look around at all the stuff I need to be doing, or look outside, and I start getting twitchy.
Sigh.

 

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28 responses to this post.

  1. Yech, what a terrifying (and once you are safe) and annoying condition! But, getting twitchy is a sure sign of recovery, so there’s that! I cannot tell you how good it’s been to see you on FB. FB is a good place when we haven’t the strength or will to blog. Hugs!!!

    Reply

  2. Yikes! Please accept my best wishes for a speedy recovery.

    Reply

  3. Posted by Margy Rydzynski on December 6, 2012 at 2:43 pm

    Holy cow – that’s quite an adventure! My mother has had similar problems throughout her life and I can see what lack of oxygen can do to your ability to focus and think. Good luck and get better.

    Reply

    • It took me a while to figure out that it was really a thing, and not just random flakiness.
      My sympathy to your mom – pretty much everyone tells me I will make a complete recovery, but I’m still sooooooo over it by now already!

      Reply

  4. Sounds awful! Hope you feel better soon.

    Reply

  5. Poor Lauo! I saw you comment on someone else’s blog that you’d been in the hospital — it sounds scary. Very glad to hear that you’re slowly coming along.

    Reply

  6. I’m happy to see you back. When you first mentioned you had PE in both lungs, I freaked. It’s a good sign that they let you out of the hospital and you’re not hooked up to a ventilator. I’m also amused at the thought of the cats running after your oxygen tubing. (Well, as long as they aren’t yanking it out of your nose or the tank.) Still, you should holler for help if you need it. That’s what we’re all here for, we ex-Voxers.

    Don’t mistake boredom for recovery. Sitting still and recovering is hard work. There’s a reason why you still tire easily. Your body is saying, “I need to rest.” Sleeping is boring but it’s a perfect way to spend a rainy, sunless afternoon.

    Reply

    • Well apparently I am “in really good health,” as the emergency room person said.
      Which seemed really odd as a thing to say in the circumstances, but then that night the woman in the next hospital bed went from functional to incoherent in two hours, and disappeared while I was asleep, and I realized the doctor had a point.
      I’ve stayed coherent, never passed out, and my heart is just fine — they checked it out very thoroughly.
      It’s just the breathing thing.
      So I have a loud machine making oxygen, and a long tube from it that lets me go to the bathroom and kitchen, but not really out the door.
      And it fills the small tanks they left, which give me about two hours.
      And a gigantoid back-up emergency tank that we actually ended up needing when the power went out.
      The nose thing and the tubing are getting to the point of pissing me off, but I can’t rally walk around without them.
      Mostly the guys are okay about it, and just sit on the tubing, so that I am dragging them around with me.
      There is the occasional nibble, but it doesn’t seem to appeal.
      They are being very supportive.
      There’s one on the couch with me all the time – I’m on the couch cos the stairs are still a very very bad idea – and always another somewhere in the room watching for a chance.
      So resting is okay.
      I’ve even had naps, which is rather strange but felt fine.
      But I’m also trying to be up and walking about, but it is slow going.
      It all seems slow going at this point.

      Reply

  7. Great to see you are improving!!!! Sleep is so not boring. DO you ever listen to Books on CD? Its easier than reading!!!

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  8. OMG! I had no idea that this had happened, and am *so* glad to hear that you’re starting to get better… as HG said, recovery is hard work.

    Hoping that you’re feeling less fidgety, and more able to relax and just rest during the day (naps are, imo, a great gift).

    Reply

  9. Am also wondering if you guys have a Roku (or similar type of box) hooked up to the TV? I would have gone bats last December (when I had a super-persistent sinus infection that left me feeling terrible) if not for that… Roku has a lot of “radio” channels in addition to things like Netflix streaming… though no audiobooks.

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  10. Holy crap! That is scary. I’m glad you are on the mend, but man, that is slow! How does this happen, is it hereditary or what? (I guess I’ll look it up) How frightening. Sending out recovery mojo to you.

    Reply

  11. All of the above and more Holy Crap! This happened to one of my co-workers. Very bad thing. You do not have permission to die! No way! You take care of what’s still alive and you get better! Wowsers. (((HUGS)))

    Reply

    • It was very scary.
      One of the moms I knew from Sair’s ballet had just dropped dead from it a couple of years ago, so you can imagine just how unnerved I was in the ER.
      But what I gather from the doctors is, you either just die immediately, or you mostly don’t.
      So having not simply died right away, I will probably recover.
      And they also say that it is a thing you get all the way over, rather than just being chronically sick forever after
      Apparently lung is squishy, and just sort of fills in for the missing bits, so I may not ever be an Olympic runner, but I should be walking around just fine.
      Eventually, it is just the recovering to get through.

      Hugs much appreciated!

      Reply

  12. Posted by tomzone on December 7, 2012 at 5:33 am

    I thought you’d gone out drinking with Keith Richards, and ended up in a Fijian jail. For the third time.

    Seriously, GAH! I’m glad they caught it when they did, and that it’s not worse than it is (which is sufficiently unpleasant by anyone’s standards). ((hugs)) And all good thoughts for a speedy recovery.

    Reply

  13. YIKES and gah! So glad to hear that you are safe and on the road to recovery, but gahhhh! (((((((hugs))))))

    Reply

  14. Glad it’s all working out, however slowly that may be.

    A friend of mine had this, and recovered just fine with no recurrence. As long as you give up the chewing tobacco – as he did – you’ll be fine, lol. (His came from being a cop and sitting in the same spot for a day or two watching a meth lab).

    Reply

  15. I’ve been wondering whether being tied to the computer while Sair was in Lower Manhattan when Sandy hit might have done it.
    There were about three-four days where I was basically just online, trying to figure out where the water did and didn’t hit.
    (The answer being 1 1/2 blocks east.)
    So one note to self involves making sure I am totally active – to the extent that I can move around, for now.
    And I’ll give up that wad of chewing tobacco too, of course!

    Reply

  16. Eegads! I had similar exhaustion after my surgery so I can sympathize with that part but, obviously, the cause was FAR less significant.

    I hope you recovery rapidly and are feeling normal much sooner than projected!

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  17. How skeery! I hope you recover very soon! I know someone whose mom died from one of those. It’s not allowed to happen to you

    Reply

    • I know someone who died from one.
      I tell you, it made for unnerving times in the Emergency Room.
      But evidently either people die right off, or they get all better, pretty much.
      Me, I’m keeping my eye on that “all better” part of things.

      Reply

  18. I’m so sorry this happened to you and can imagine how scary the experience was. I’m glad to read that you are slowly recovering. It might be slow but it’s in the right direction….

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  19. Oh, wow.
    Sorry about how you have to wait for the clots to dissolve, etc. But hooray for getting things as improved as they are now. You’re very brave.
    (((((((((((((((((hugs)))))))))))))))))))

    Reply

  20. Sorry to read about this (having not logged in to WP for ages, I am doing massive catch up). Hope you gets better soon! Even if six months seems a long time, it’s only half a year, and that’s not that long, really. Hugs and best wishes

    Reply

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