HPV vaccination

I'd been wondering why they were only vaccinating girls, when boys are a transmission vector.
And if you were trying to wipe out a virus, wouldn't you want to eliminate the source and all.

Logically, if you want to protect your girls, you need to vaccinate the boys too, no?
Is not a single-gender virus.

I just came across this:

"HPV vaccine will eventually be available for boys and men ages 9 to 26
because the Food and Drug Administration approved it for prevention of
genital warts in October."

Well, that's nice.
Wouldn't want them getting warts on their little heehaws in the course of transmitting potentially lethel germies….

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21 responses to this post.

  1. Yes. exactly.

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  2. My guess: I think it was probably a lot easier to get funding for development and clinical testing of the vaccine as a preventive for cervical cancer, and that's why that came first. Getting it approved for prevention of warts in men is a different use, and would require a different clinical study; one much easier to get money for once you've already got it approved for the other use.

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  3. Mark is exactly right.

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  4. How odd.I'd tend to think of a vaccination as fighting a specific pathogen.– in this case a virus effecting both sexes –regardless of whether the symptoms presented by infection differed.

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  5. Not exactly in this case. Gardasil–the original vaccine by GSK–protects against 2 of the four strains of HPV that have specifically been linked to cervical cancer. There is another vaccine coming out (maybe it's already out in the US?) protects against all four. But there are dozens of HPV strains that cause genital warts. And it would have been extremely hard to get the millions in funding needed to protect against something annoying but non-lethal like genital warts, as opposed to cancer.

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  6. ooointeresting

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  7. It was first available to women because HPV is thought to be the biggest cause of cervical cancer, and hey if a woman is vaccinated, it doesn't matter if her partner has HPV. It was simply less urgent to get around to vaccinating guys.
    It has become much more urgent to vaccinate guys now that they have discovered that the four strains of HPV that cause cervical cancer in women also can cause oral cancers as well, and that obviously both women and men are susceptible to these.

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  8. Warts are the only way for guys to know if they even have HPV. And I don't believe it's the warty strains (which make up only 2% of the strains) that lead to cancer.

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  9. My peeps are all awesomely informed.

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  10. My goodness–this is an informed bunch! This was a great discussion. Thanks for sharing.

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  11. I read an article awhile back about some guys in Europe that are proud of getting STDs. It's like a medal to show how many girls they slept with. I wish I was kidding

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  12. From what I've read (I'm in the health research sector) the cancer-causing strains can cause warts, but not always. Researchers believe that up to 80% of sexually active people are infected with some form of HPV, and since it's common to be completely asymptomatic, and condoms don't protect against HPV, it's very easy to keep shedding the virus throughout your life. Ew, right? On an aside, I met the German Nobel prizewinner who actually identified the cervical cancer causing HPV strains 2 weeks ago. How cool is that?

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  13. Very interesting indeed! My peeps are always very knowledgeable.

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  14. Very cool, yes! And that's good to know about the warts thing – i actually did know that already because one of my GF's who had the pre-cancer stuff did have the warts strain. Everyone else I've known who has had the pre-cancer scares did not. And yeah, that's how all skin viruses work. you can go years without symptoms and still be shedding.

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  15. Yeah, but I didn't even find out about the, "o, bai teh way, condom + HPV = epic fail, kthxbai" a few years ago. Never had warts, but I had the pre-cancer (squamous cell whatever whatever) scare in my late 20s, so I just assume I'm carrying, like 8 out of 10 people who get their freak on. And I'm too old for the vaccine. Nice, eh? We might as well all join the convent.

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  16. For all of this, I still don't see why they aren't vaccinating boys to prevent them from serving as points of transmission to girls.If boys can't transmit it, then that also protects girls, not all of whom will be vaccinated.And it would cause the virus to become rare sooner.Just because boys aren't going to get cervical cancer doesn't mean that they shouldn't be involved in eliminating the virus that causes it.From the standpoint of doing away with the pathogen, isn't this like only innoculating half the population against, say, polio?

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  17. I'm in the same boat. For all i know it won't ever come back. So I look at it this way – considering how common it is and how few of the people who actually have it ever get cancer, as long as you keep an eye on it, it's a minor thing.

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  18. Well a lot of people are worried about side effects of vaccinations. So if the vaccination is seen by parents as essentially altruistic (the boys having it for the sake of protecting possible future female partners), but that it might have other side effects that affect their child …. then I can see their point. So getting the word out about oral cancer is important, because it is a reason to vaccinate their child against HPV regardless of gender. As far as I know, the UK has the vaccination approved for boys now.

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  19. When they were testing the safety and efficacy of the vaccine, it was faster to test on and get approval for one gender and age group first, i.e., girls aged 12-25. to run clinical trials on a wider age group and both sexes (especially with the end goal being different) would have taken much longer.

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  20. We have a winner!!!!Thanks!This makes sense of it.

    Reply

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